Sunday, November 25, 2007

The Promise of Authority in Social Scholarship


At the 2007 Charleston Conference held November 7-10, Laura B. Cohen, Web Support Librarian at the University of Albany, SUNY, joined Leigh Dodds, Chief Technology Officer of the scholarly publisher Ingenta, to speak on the theme of "Authoritative? What's That? And Who Says?"


November 8 2007 / Thursday, 2:00 – 2:50 PM / Concurrent Session 1

Web 2.0 makes it easier for anyone to publish information online, and search engines make content more easily findable. But how do users know what information is authoritative? Do they even understand what "authoritative" means? And who defines that something is "authoritative" in the first place?

In scholarly publishing, the peer review process is an indicator of quality. But as content is increasingly mashed-up, syndicated and blogged in many different locations, how do users differentiate between peer reviewed content, and \"user generated content\"? And is there a natural progression from the creative chaos of Wikipedia, through the “gentle expert oversight" of Citizendium to, ultimately, the closed rigorous approach of double-blind peer review.

[http://www.katina.info/conference/program.php]

And is there a natural progression from the creative chaos of Wikipedia, through the “gentle expert oversight" of Citizendium to, ultimately, the closed rigorous approach of double-blind peer review? Laura's PPT presentation titled"The Promise of Authority in Social Scholarship" is available on SlideShare

[http://www.slideshare.net/lcohen/the-promise-of-authority-in-social-scholarship/]

[http://liblogs.albany.edu/library20/2007/11/presentation_on_the_metrics_of.html]

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