Tuesday, June 10, 2008

SIN: The Next Stage Of Web Evolution = Web 3.0

Colleagues/

For Your Consideration ...


Is Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) [:-)] The Next Stage of Web Evolution = Web 3.0?

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_3]


The Big Picture(sm): Visual Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases
The Big Picture(sm): Visual Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply information visualization technologies for enhancing use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases, notably MARC and bibliographic records. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/BigPic.htm]


The Magic Touch(sm): Haptic Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases
The Magic Touch(sm): Haptic Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply Haptic, Tactile, or Kinaesthetic interfaces, displays, or interactive technologies to enhance use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is currently, or was formerly, affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Touch.htm]


The Next WAVe(sm): Auditory Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases
The Next WAVe(sm): Auditory Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply auditory interfaces, displays or interactive technologies to enhance use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is currently, or was formerly, affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Wave.htm]

Text~Tone(sm): Auditory Highlighting/Rating of Text
[http://tinyurl.com/53vmxn]

Text~Touch(sm): Haptic Highlighting/Rating of Text
[http://tinyurl.com/3uznzo]

See Also:

Morning Becomes Electric: Post-Modern Scholarly Information Access, Organization, and Navigation

[http://scholarship20.blogspot.com/2008/06/morning-becomes-electric-post-modern.html]

"New Age Navigation: Innovative Information Interfaces for Electronic Journals"

Article: [http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/NewAge.pdf]

PPT: [http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/NewAgeIL.ppt]

BTW: I have created a Facebook Global Group for Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) at



[http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=15798543757]

Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) is devoted to documenting, discussing, and disseminating information about multi-modal technologies (auditory, haptic, visual, etc.) for accessing and navigating any and all information spaces.

Please Consider Joining ...

Your Thoughts? Please Post As Comments To This Blog Entry ... .

Thanks!

/Gerry

Unrelated

NPR: Body Parts In Song: From Hands To Eyes

[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94109631]

Fleshmap

[http://www.fleshmap.com/]

2 comments:

John Maxstadt said...

Aren't we missing a valuable and important dimension? Olfactory information is a powerful memory trigger. Shouldn't we also be able to smell the text? That way, when critics refer to a book or article as a stinker, it could be literally true!

Anonymous said...

Gerry,

One problem I see with this line of development is some disconnect between the online forms of communication proposed and the real world communiations that people engage in on a daily basis.

While all the senses are more or less engaged in a face to face conversation between two humans, we tend to cognitively zero in on the central senses that facilitate communication. Depending on what's being communicated, the addition of sensory information *might* heighten the quality of the communciation or it may cause cognitive dissonance.

For example, a man talking to a woman on a date might notice the woman's perfume or, if they are holding hands, the quality of her skin, warmth (or not), etc. and these factors may affect the closeness that he feels for her (and vice versa - although, being a guy, I won't presume to speak on women's behalf. :)

In a lecture or an academic discussion though, this information would be a distraction from the central collection of ideas presented. OK, chances are most people wouldn't be holding hands in that situation too, but we're speaking of general sensory integration and the ways in which it might enhance communication and cognition.

So, in my way of thinking, what you're writing about here is more or less a revolutionary concept of focusing/enhancing communication.

There are already some methods used to enhance communication on the web. "Strong" and "em" (emphasis) tags have a direct outcome in screen readers and bolding and italics are the visual correspondents to those (although there's a fair amount of debate as to how directly they correspond, given that bolding and italics are used for titles and other non-emphatic purposes in some writing styles.)

What you seem to be proposing would move a step or two beyond that, drawing on sensory integration to emphasize focus or enhance specific meaning.

Since humans are adapting to multi-threaded forms of communication (scrolls and sidebards on television news and sporting programs) it's not inconceivable to imagine that we wouldn't be able to adapt to this kind of enhanced communication as well.

However, given the trends toward multi-threaded forms of communication and the focus on quantity and variety of information, this kind of sensory encompassing communication does seem counter-intuitive.

On the other hand, given that science has drawn some connections between synesthesia (the process of information in one sensory area stimulating other senses - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia - yes, I know, Wikipedia, but it's useful info), and enhanced cognition and more efficient information processing, such a revolutionary idea may have legs.

Cheers,

Clint Brooks