Friday, June 13, 2008

Social Science Research Network: Everyone Can Be A Star

Social Science Research Network (SSRN) is devoted to the rapid worldwide dissemination of social science research and is composed of a number of specialized research networks in each of the social sciences.

SSRN Research Networks:

Accounting Research Network (ARN)
Economics Research Network (ERN)
Entrepreneurship & Policy Network (ERPN)
Financial Economics Newtork (FEN)
Health Economics Network (HEN)
Information Systems Network (ISN)
Legal Scholarship Network (LSN)


Submitted abstracts and by soliciting abstracts of top quality research papers around the world. We now have hundreds of journals, publishers, and institutions in Partners in Publishing that provide working papers for distribution through SSRN's eLibrary and abstracts for publication in SSRN's electronic journals.

The SSRN eLibrary consists of two parts: an Abstract Database containing abstracts on over 188,200 scholarly working papers and forthcoming papers and an Electronic Paper Collection currently containing over 151,200 downloadable full text documents in Adobe Acrobat pdf format. The eLibrary also includes the research papers of a number of Fee Based Partner Publications.

The Networks encourage readers to communicate directly with authors and other subscribers concerning their own and others' research. To facilitate this we publish detailed author contact information including email addresses for authors of each paper. We also provide electronic delivery of the papers when authors wish us to do so from the SSRN eLibrary. You may also Browse the SSRN eLibrary, view our current Top Papers or search the electronic library for papers by Title, Author, or Journal/Topic.

Source

[http://www.ssrn.com/]

SSRN eLibrary Statistics

Papers & Authors

Abstracts: 189,513
Full Text Papers: 152,264
Authors: 94,912
Papers Received in
Last 6 months: 20,336

Paper Downloads

To date: 21,683,352
Last 12 months: 5,370,136
Last 30 days: 587,886

CiteReader

Papers with Resolved References: 113,727
Total References: 3,772,715
Papers with Cites: 92,267
Total Cited by Links: 1,868,324
Papers with Resolved Footnotes: 14,355
Total Footnotes: 1,828,234

[http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/DisplayAbstractSearch.cfm]

Definitions of Measures Associated with References, Cites, and Cited by

[http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/about_citereader.html]

Related

NYTimes: Now Professors Get Their Star Rankings, Too.

[
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/09/business/media/09link.html]

CHE: Online Network Is Established for Scholars in Humanities

[http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i10/10a00102.htm]

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Citation Statistics: A Report From The International Mathematical Union

Citation Statistics
A report from the International Mathematical Union (IMU) in cooperation with the International Council of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM) and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS)

Executive Summary

This is a report about the use and misuse of citation data in the assessment of scientific research. The idea that research assessment must be done using "simple and objective" methods is increasingly prevalent today. The "simple and objective" methods are broadly interpreted as bibliometrics, that is, citation data and the statistics derived from them. There is a belief that citation statistics are inherently more accurate because they substitute simple numbers for complex judgments, and hence overcome the possible subjectivity of peer review. But this belief is unfounded.
  • Relying on statistics is not more accurate when the statistics are improperly used. Indeed, statistics can mislead when they are misapplied or misunderstood. Much of modern bibliometrics seems to rely on experience and intuition about the interpretation and validity of citation statistics.

  • While numbers appear to be "objective", their objectivity can be illusory. The meaning of a citation can be even more subjective than peer review. Because this subjectivity is less obvious for citations, those who use citation data are less likely to understand their limitations.

  • The sole reliance on citation data provides at best an incomplete and often shallow understanding of research—an understanding that is valid only when reinforced by other judgments. Numbers are not inherently superior to sound judgments.

Using citation data to assess research ultimately means using citation‐based statistics to rank things—journals, papers, people, programs, and disciplines. The statistical tools used to rank these things are often misunderstood and misused.

  • For journals, the impact factor is most often used for ranking. This is a simple average derived from the distribution of citations for a collection of articles in the journal. The average captures only a small amount of information about that distribution, and it is a rather crude statistic. In addition, there are many confounding factors when judging journals by citations, and any comparison of journals requires caution when using impact factors. Using the impact factor alone to judge a journal is like using weight alone to judge a person's health.

  • For papers, instead of relying on the actual count of citations to compare individual papers, people frequently substitute the impact factor of the journals in which the papers appear. They believe that higher impact factors must mean higher citation counts. But this is often not the case! This is a pervasive misuse of statistics that needs to be challenged whenever and wherever it occurs.

  • For individual scientists, complete citation records can be difficult to compare. As a consequence, there have been attempts to find simple statistics that capture the full complexity of a scientist's citation record with a single number. The most notable of these is the h‐index, which seems to be gaining in popularity. But even a casual inspection of the h‐index and its variants shows that these are na├»ve attempts to understand complicated citation records. While they capture a small amount of information about the distribution of a scientist's citations, they lose crucial information that is essential for the assessment of research.

The validity of statistics such as the impact factor and h‐index is neither well understood nor well studied. The connection of these statistics with research quality is sometimes established on the basis of "experience." The justification for relying on them is that they are "readily available." The few studies of these statistics that were done focused narrowly on showing a correlation with some other measure of quality rather than on determining how one can best derive useful information from citation data.

We do not dismiss citation statistics as a tool for assessing the quality of research—citation data and statistics can provide some valuable information. We recognize that assessment must be practical, and for this reason easily‐derived citation statistics almost surely will be part of the process. But citation data provide only a limited and incomplete view of research quality, and the statistics derived from citation data are sometimes poorly understood and misused. Research is too important to measure its value with only a single coarse tool.

We hope those involved in assessment will read both the commentary and the details of this report in order to understand not only the limitations of citation statistics but also how better to use them. If we set high standards for the conduct of science, surely we should set equally high standards for assessing its quality.

Joint IMU/ICIAM/IMS‐Committee on Quantitative Assessment of Research
Robert Adler, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology
John Ewing (Chair), American Mathematical Society
Peter Taylor, University of Melbourne

Source And Full-Text Available At

[http://www.mathunion.org/fileadmin/IMU/Report/CitationStatistics.pdf]

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Pubmed Faceoff: The Extreme MakeOver MashUp For Search Results

Friends/

A Most Impressive Development !

/Gerry

Pubmed Faceoff

What's this all about?

This site applies a simple, photorealistic variant of the Chernoff Faces visualization technique

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chernoff_faces]

[http://kspark.kaist.ac.kr/Human%20Engineering.files/Chernoff/Chernoff%20Faces.htm]

to impact factor data for papers in the PubMed database of biomedical literature. Basically it allows you to search PubMed and have the results represented as a set of human faces. "I was published a couple of years ago in a crap journal and nobody is citing me."

The theory is that mapping multidimensional data (in this case the age, journal impact factor and citation count associated with each paper) to facial features takes advantage of the fact that our brains are highly tuned to recognise, process and differentiate between human faces.

"I was published a couple of years ago in a mid-tier journal. I've got slightly more citations than expected."

Each paper is represented as a face. The ethnicity and gender of the face is selected at random for visual interest - you can turn this feature off if you so choose.

"I was published recently in a good journal. Citations are as expected."

The age of a face correlates with the publication date of the paper. Younger faces are more recent papers. "I was published recently in a good journal and I'm getting lots of citations."

A smile means that the paper has been cited more times than expected (based on its age).

Larger smiles mean more citations.

A frown means that the paper has been cited far less than you might expect.

The raised eyebrows correlate with the impact factor (sort of - actually the Eigenfactor) of the journal in which the paper was published.

[http://www.eigenfactor.org/]

Source
[http://www.postgenomic.com/faces/index.php]

Thanks To

/ Frank Norman /Librarian / National Institute for Medical Research / The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA, UK /

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

ViewPlus: Feeling is More Than Seeing

Friends/

A Remarkle Development: Tactile Reading .

/Gerry

[snip]

What the ViewPlus technology does is to create image files that can be rendered in tactile form (via a tactile touchpad or printed out with an embossing printer) and also in audio (via text-to-speech technology). At the core of this technology is an image format known as SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics). Unlike bitmapped image formats like TIFF and JPEG, SVG is an XML-based format that provides the images as vector graphics (the core of PostScript and PDF) with text and metadata in XML.

The ViewPlus technology does what Dr. Gardner referred to as the "best possible conversion" from any given image format. When the images are already in vector form (for example, as EPS files within a PostScript or PDF file), it converts them to very accessible SVGs. When dealing with the more common TIFF or JPEG files, the software detects and OCRs the text (including labels within the graphics) and does the best it can with the image file. But having done so, it enables the software—or the user—to infer information about that graphic information. In fact, the next version of the ViewPlus software will enable authoring, so that users can add descriptive information to the SVG file.

The benefits to the print-disabled user are obvious. Dr. Gardner demonstrated how a graph that was otherwise inaccessible to a print-disabled user was made meaningful: He could feel the slopes of the various lines on the graph, and as he did so, the software read labels describing the lines, including the values of datapoints, as he touched them.

The most electrifying moment of Gardner's presentation came when he pointed out how excited his sighted physicist colleagues were when they saw this demonstrated with a graphic. What the ViewPlus software had done with that image was nothing less than adding the semantics that takes it from being "dumb" to dynamic data. Imagine a whole collection of such images in which a researcher could use a computer to search for certain patterns, values, and features and do comparisons or calculations on them.

This is Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the Semantic Web: information that a computer can understand. Not just store, find, and deliver, but understand.

[snip]

Source

[http://sspnet.org/News/ViewPlus_Makes_Images_Accessible/news.aspx]

SIN: The Next Stage Of Web Evolution = Web 3.0

Colleagues/

For Your Consideration ...


Is Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) [:-)] The Next Stage of Web Evolution = Web 3.0?

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_3]


The Big Picture(sm): Visual Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases
The Big Picture(sm): Visual Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply information visualization technologies for enhancing use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases, notably MARC and bibliographic records. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/BigPic.htm]


The Magic Touch(sm): Haptic Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases
The Magic Touch(sm): Haptic Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply Haptic, Tactile, or Kinaesthetic interfaces, displays, or interactive technologies to enhance use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is currently, or was formerly, affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Touch.htm]


The Next WAVe(sm): Auditory Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases
The Next WAVe(sm): Auditory Browsing in Web and non-Web Databases is a clearinghouse of projects, research, products and services that describe or apply auditory interfaces, displays or interactive technologies to enhance use and access to Web and selected non-Web databases. Selected significant reports, papers, and articles are also provided for each profiled activity. The clearinghouse is arranged by the name of the university, corporation, or other organization with which the principal investigator of a project is currently, or was formerly, affiliated. A general bibliography of applicable works is also provided. [Suspended]
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Wave.htm]

Text~Tone(sm): Auditory Highlighting/Rating of Text
[http://tinyurl.com/53vmxn]

Text~Touch(sm): Haptic Highlighting/Rating of Text
[http://tinyurl.com/3uznzo]

See Also:

Morning Becomes Electric: Post-Modern Scholarly Information Access, Organization, and Navigation

[http://scholarship20.blogspot.com/2008/06/morning-becomes-electric-post-modern.html]

"New Age Navigation: Innovative Information Interfaces for Electronic Journals"

Article: [http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/NewAge.pdf]

PPT: [http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/NewAgeIL.ppt]

BTW: I have created a Facebook Global Group for Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) at



[http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=15798543757]

Sensory Information Navigation (SIN) is devoted to documenting, discussing, and disseminating information about multi-modal technologies (auditory, haptic, visual, etc.) for accessing and navigating any and all information spaces.

Please Consider Joining ...

Your Thoughts? Please Post As Comments To This Blog Entry ... .

Thanks!

/Gerry

Unrelated

NPR: Body Parts In Song: From Hands To Eyes

[http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94109631]

Fleshmap

[http://www.fleshmap.com/]

Monday, June 9, 2008

Morning Becomes Electric: Post-Modern Scholarly Information Access, Organization, and Navigation

Morning Becomes Electric: Post-Modern Scholarly Information Access, Organization, and Navigation

"The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Invent It" / Alan Kay

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
Science and Technology Librarian and Bibliographer
Iowa State University Library
Ames IA 50011


Abstract
Scholars are facing unprecedented Information Overload in their attempts to identify potentially relevant information sources. Electronic networks have not only expedited traditional forms of publishing but created new formal and informal opportunities for communication. Conventional methods of information management are reaching the limits of their effectiveness. To enhance access to information in the coming decades, systems that fully utilize the digital nature of a growing number of scholarly resources must be implemented.

Scholarly Communication

Indexing and Abstracting Services

Access

Transformational Communication

Organization

Navigation

"In The Beginning ... "

References

Original Available At

[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Morning.htm]

See Also

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mourning_Becomes_Electra]

Text~Touch(sm): Haptic Highlighting/Rating of Text

Friends/

Not Only Is The World Not Black&White, It Is Not Just A Carousel of Color



Humans Are MultiModal Creatures With MultiModal Minds

Here Within I Propose The Development and Implementation of Technology That Would Allow Authors/Readers to Highlight Text With Varying Degrees of Texture.

TEXTURE
Wikipedia: Texture refers to the properties held and sensations caused by the external surface of objects received through the sense of
touch.

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texture]


Using Other/Related Haptic Technology Readers Would be Able To Feel The Range of Textures Layered Over The Text Within A Corpus.

Such Texture Could Be Used to Denote Another Dimension Of The Text OR Denote Relative Importance.

[http://scholarship20.blogspot.com/2008/06/writecolorsm-multicoloring-for.html]

THINK That This Is FarFetched? Not Really.

A Decade Ago I Began to Explore Haptic Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases

The Magic Touch(sm) [http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/Touch.htm]

/Gerry

Text~Tone(sm): Auditory Highlighting/Rating of Text

Friends/

Not Only Is The World Not Black&White, It Is Not Just A Carousel of Color, Nor Haptic

Humans Are MultiModal Creatures With MultiModal Minds

[http://www.ncte.org/edpolicy/multimodal]


Here Within I Propose The Development and Implementation of Technology That Would Allow Authors/Readers to Highlight Text With Varying Degrees of Sound.


SOUND
Wikipedia:Sound is vibration transmitted through a solid, liquid, or gas; particularly, sound means those vibrations composed of frequencies capable of being detected by ears.



Using Other/Related Audio/Auditory Technologies Readers Would be Able To Hear That Range of Tones Layered Over The Text Within A Corpus And/Or Substitute And/Or Supplement An Author's Audio/Auditory Layer


Such Tones Could Be Used to Denote Another Dimension Of The Text OR Denote Relative Importance.


THINK That This Is FarFetched? Not Really. Nearly A Decade Ago I Began to Explore Auditory Browsing Interaction in Web and non-Web Databases

The NextWAVe(sm)



/Gerry

Sunday, June 8, 2008

WriteColor(sm): MultiColoring for HighLighting/Rating Text

Friends/

The Time Has Come To Open Our Eyes And Realize That The World Is A Carousel of Color

[http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/televisiontvthemelyrics-kidsshows/waltdisneyswonderfulworldofcolor.htm]

Here-WithIn-I-Offer-A-Proposal-That-I-Believe-ALL-Will-Recognize-As-The-Next-Logical-Step-In-How-We-Write-Read-Assess-Interpret-Text: The World-Is-No-Longer-Black-Or-White.

I Propose That All Give Serious Consideration To Writing-In-Color(s) , With Each Color Representing A Respective Level of Significance Within A Text.

The Visible Spectrum Would Be The Basis For The Relative Levels Of Significance Of Given Text WHERE

  • Text of Least Importance Would Be Highlighted In RED;
  • Text of Intermediate Importance Highlighted In GREEN;
  • Text of Greatest Importance Highlighted in VIOLET, and
  • Text of In-Between Importance Highlighted in Appropriate Colors: ORANGE, BLUE, INDIGO
Initially, TEXT would be COLORED at the PARAGRAPH LEVEL By The Author(s).

Adjoining OR Disjunct Sections of Text Could Have The SAME COLOR.

Upon Publication, The Reader Would Have The Ability To ReCOLOR The TEXT To
Reflect His/Her View On The Relative Significant Of Text In His/Her Opinion And/Or Relative To A Particular Purpose.

I also envision a feature by which
The Reader would be able to colorlight individual terms and/or phrases.

Readers would also have the ability to assess the value of The Overall TEXT by LABELING THE TEXT with One Color (Color Digg).

[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digg]

The Higher The Color, The More Significant The Text.

Any AND All Reactions To This Proposal Are Strongly Encouraged By Posting A Comment On This Entry.

BTW: Don't Even Think of Patenting This Idea - My Lawyers Are Bigger Than Yours [:-)

/Gerry

WriteColor(sm): Where Color is Primary(sm)

Purple Rules(sm)

Thursday, June 5, 2008

Emerald InTouch

Emerald InTouch is a web space and hosting service designed to support learning and collaboration. By bringing together technologies such as blogs, wikis and RSS into one place, Emerald InTouch enables users to create and join communities of practice, engage in reflective learning and collaborate with peers online.


Features

* Record personal and group reflections;
* Create and join online communities of practice;
* Engage in group discussions;;
* Create personal knowledge repositories or e-portfolios;
* Collaborate with fellow students online; Subscribe to RSS feeds;
* Share multimedia files.

Benefits

* Secure environment for learning and reflection;
* Student-centered not course-led;
* Communities can capture and retain shared knowledge/learning;
* Reduces isolation for distance learners;
* Hosted service frees up institutional IT resources;
* Comprehensive access controls - content can be as private or as public as you wish;
* Provides opportunity for institutions to maintain links with former students or connect with future students.


How is Emerald InTouch currently being used?

* To support distance learning courses at a leading academic institution - students record personal and group reflections on their blogs, assess each other's work by uploading multi-media files, use InTouch as a space to meet and get to know each other prior to the first face-to-face lesson;

* To reduce graduate isolation and support executive MBA courses at a major multi-national firm- employees share ideas and application of theory in between face-to-face training sessions, graduates are encouraged to network with each other despite being based in different offices around the world.

[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/content/about.php]


User Manual

* Your Profile
[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/profile.html]
* Your Blog
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/blog.html]
* Your Files
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/files.html]
* Your Network
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/network.html]
* Account Settings
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/settings.html]

[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Services/index.html]

InTouch Features

* Tagging
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/tagging.html]
* Syndication
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/syndication.html]
* Podcasting
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/podcasting.html]
* Communities
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/communities.html]
* External Services
[
http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/external.html]

[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Features/index.html]

Tutorials

These movies offer a quick over of how to complete a particular activity.

* Add a personal wiki page
* Adding friends to your friends list
* Create a folder and upload a file
* Create a new community
* Edit community profileSearching
* Subscribe to new RSS Feed
* Upload icons
* Your blog archive and categories

[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/Tutorials/index.html]

White Pages / Emerald InTouch Member Directory

[http://intouch.emeraldinsight.com/content/directory.php]

Emerald InTouch is Elgg Powered

[http://elgg.net/]

Related

Open Source Social Networking Software/Sites

Monday, June 2, 2008

The Wild, Wild Wiki Wiki / Wiki Writing: Collaborative Learning in the College Classroom

Friends/

I've Made A Major (Re)Discovery Today That I Believe/Hope Will Be Of Wide Interest.

/Gerry

The Wild, Wild Wiki / Wiki Writing: Collaborative Learning in the College Classroom


[http://www.flickr.com/photos/mushon/245403938/]

THE WIKI

The Wild, Wild Wiki

Table of Contents

Volume Preface
Robert E. Cummings, Columbus State University, and Matt Barton, St. Cloud State University

Volume Introduction

“WhatWas a Wiki, and Why Do I Care? A Short and Usable History of Wikis”/ Robert E. Cummings, Columbus State University / 18 pages

Wikis and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Chapter 1: “Wikis in the Classroom: A Taxonomy” / Mark Phillipson, Columbia University / 42 pages

Chapter 2: “Wiki Justice, Social Ergonomics, and Ethical Collaborations” / Jonah Bossewitch, Columbia University ; John Frankfurt, Columbia University ; Alexander Sherman, Civic Consulting Alliance ; Robin D.G. Kelley, Columbia University / 38 pages

Chapter 4: “Building Learning Communities with Wikis” / Dan Gilbert, Stanford University ; Helen L. Chen, Stanford University ; Jeremy Sabol, Stanford University / 28 pages

Chapter 5: “Content and Commentary: Parallel Structures of Organization and Interaction on Wikis” / Will Lakeman, Independent Scholar / 21 pages

Wikis in Composition and Communication

Chapter 3: “Disrupting Intellectual Property: Collaboration and Resistance in Wikis” / Stephanie Vie, Fort Lewis College ; Jennifer deWinter, University of Arizona / 19 pages

Chapter 9: “Wiki Lore and Politics in the Classroom” / Cathlena Martin, University of Florida Lisa Dusenberry, University of Florida / 16 pages

Chapter 10: “An (Old) First-Timer's Learning Curve: Curiosity, Trial, Resistance, and Accommodation” / Bob Whipple, Creighton University / 15 pages

Chapter 12: “Above and Below the Double Line: Refactoring and that Old-Time Revision” / Michael C Morgan, Bemidji State University / 17 pages

Chapter 13: “Success Through Simplicity: On Developmental Writing and Community of Inquiry.” / John W. Maxwell, Simon Fraser University ; Michael Felczak, Simon Fraser University / 20 pages

Chapter 14: “Wiki as Textshop: Constructing Knowledge in the Electronic Classroom” / Thomas J. Nelson, University of Texas, Austin / 10 pages

Wikis and the Higher Education Classroom

Chapter 6: “Is there a Wiki in this Class? Wikibooks and the Future of Higher Education” / Matt Barton, St. Cloud State University / 23 pages

Chapter 7: “Agency and Accountability: The Paradoxes of Wiki Discourse” / Daniel Caeton, University of California, Davis / 17 pages

Chapter 8: “One Wiki, Two Classrooms” / David Elfving, University of Illinois, Chicago ; Ericka Menchen-Trevino, Northwestern University / 10 pages

Chapter 15:
“Glossa Technologia: Anatomy of a Wiki-Based Annotated Bibliography” / Ben McCorkle, Ohio State University, Marion / 9 pages

Source

[http://www.wildwiki.net/mediawiki/index.php?title=Main_Page]

THE PRINTED BOOK

Wiki Writing: Collaborative Learning in the College Classroom / Robert Cummings and Matt Barton, Editors /

An indispensable and engaging guide to using wikis in the classroom

About the Book

"Wiki Writing will quickly become the standard resource for using wikis in the classroom." / Jim Kalmbach, Illinois State University

When most people think of wikis, the first---and often the only---thing that comes to mind is Wikipedia. Robert E. Cummings and Matt Barton, the editors of Wiki Writing: Collaborative Learning in the College Classroom, have assembled a collection of essays which challenges this common misconception, providing an engaging and helpful array of perspectives on the many pressing theoretical and practical issues that wikis raise. Written in an accessible manner that will appeal to specialists and novices alike, Wiki Writing draws on a wealth of practical experiences to offer a series of detailed suggestions about how educators can realize the potential of these new writing environments.

Robert E. Cummings is Assistant Professor of English and Director of First-year Composition at Columbus State University. He also serves as the Writing Specialist for CSU's Quality Enhancement Plan, assisting teachers across campus in their efforts to maximize student writing in their curriculum.

Matt Barton is Assistant Professor at St. Cloud State University, Department of English. He is an Assistant Editor of Kairos [http://english.ttu.edu/Kairos/] and an Associate Editor of Kairosnews [http://kairosnews.org/].

/ 6 x 9 / 312 pgs. / 30 figures / 6 tables / ISBN 978-0-472-11671-3 / $24.95 / Forthcoming /

Publisher Site

[http://www.press.umich.edu/titleDetailDesc.do?id=234436]

Related

Disruptive Scholarship

MediaCommons: A Digital Scholarly Network

Using Wikipedia to Reenvision the Term Paper

Wikipedia Writing