Saturday, July 26, 2008

Launch of "Student As Scholar" Blog


The "Student As Scholar" blog was formally created on July 25 2008. The Blog is devoted to documenting relevant literature that supports the view that :



"Undergraduate education should adopt the “Student as Scholar” Model throughout the curriculum, where scholar is conceived in terms of an attitude, an intellectual posture, and a frame of mind derived from the best traditions of an engaged liberal arts education. With this framework, not only each research project, but also each course, is viewed as an integrated, and integrating, part of the student experience."

"From Convocation to Capstone: Developing the Student as Scholar"


David Hodge, Kira Pasquesi, Marissa Hirsh / Miami University ; Paul LePore / University of Washington

[http://scholarship20.blogspot.com/2008/07/student-as-scholar-scholar-as-student.html]

The "Student As Scholar" Blog Is Located At

[http://student-as-scholar.blogspot.com/]

It is a companion to the Facebook Global Group "Student As Scholar / Scholar As Scholar" which is intended to serve as a forum and venue in which members are invited to contribute to a never-ending conversation about "Student As Scholar" models and to document personal experiences and institutional initiatives.

The "Student As Scholar / Scholar As Scholar" Facebook Group is Available at

[http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=27141416631]

Please contribute citations/links to Any and All Relevant Literature As Comments on this blog.

Thanks!

/Gerry

Thursday, July 24, 2008

SPARC Webcast: The Right to Research: Engaging Students on the Topic of Access to Research

"Today’s students have come of age in the Internet era. Access to knowledge is the norm for them, rather than the exception. Students recognize how the lack of access is detrimental to research and education, and how the subscription-only model can conflict with the ethic of the academy, which is to share knowledge with everyone. I hope this guide will engage students and help them become more active participants in the campus conversation.”

(Gavin Baker, author of The Right to Research) / [http://www.arl.org/sparc/students/]

The Right to Research: Engaging Students on the Topic of Access to Research

August 6, 2008 / Wednesday / 1:00PM – 2:30PM (Eastern)

With: Gavin Baker, Graduate, University of Florida and SPARC Outreach Fellow ; Nelson Pavlosky, Law Student, George Mason University, and SPARC Summer Intern ; Heather Joseph, Executive Director, SPARC.

Moderator: Jennifer McLennan, Director of Communications, SPARC

Today’s college students – both undergraduate and graduate –possess tremendous potential for shaping the future of scholarly exchange. Appreciating student perspectives on information sharing and access to research can help to advance library outreach programs. In partnership with student leaders, SPARC has developed The Right to Research – a campaign that encourages student engagement and provides a suite of materials to help libraries connect with students on the topic of access to research. The goal of The Right to Research is to explore ways that libraries and students might advance new opportunities to work together in creating a more open system of scholarly communication.

Please join us for the latest installment in The Right to Research campaign. At this online event, student leaders Gavin Baker and Nelson Pavlosky will lead a discussion on: why working with students is critical to advancing the discussing of access to research; how to effectively engage students on campus and what resources are available; and specific actions to take next semester – including an announcement of our next nationwide on-campus event to raise awareness.

This invitation is open to SPARC members and other libraries only. You’ll need access to a phone and a Web browser to participate. Access details will be sent to registrants. Limited to 100 participants. Register by end of day, Friday, August 1, 2008 at [http://www.arl.org/sparc/meetings/event_registration.shtml]

Questions and comments may be directed to Jennifer McLennan (jennifer@arl.org).

Source [http://www.arl.org/sparc/media/08-0722.shtml]

Webcast Slides [http://www.arl.org/sparc/bm~doc/student_engagement_v3_08-aug.pdf]

Wednesday, July 23, 2008

Student As Scholar | Scholar As Student


Colleagues/

I Have Created A New Global Facebook Group Named

"Student As Scholar / Scholar As Student"

SAS/SAS Invites Any/All Anecdotes/Postings/Discussions/Etc. About Institutional/Personal Experiences And/Or Initiatives That Support The View That

"Undergraduate education should adopt the “Student as Scholar” Model throughout the curriculum, where scholar is conceived in terms of an attitude, an intellectual posture, and a frame of mind derived from the best traditions of an engaged liberal arts education. With this framework, not only each research project, but also each course, is viewed as an integrated, and integrating, part of the student experience."

David Hodge, Kira Pasquesi, Marissa Hirsh / Miami University ; Paul LePore / University of Washington

For The Full View, Please See The Blog Post

_The Student as Scholar: Undergraduate Research and Creative Practice_

[ http://scholarship20.blogspot.com/2008/07/student-as-scholar-undergraduate.html]
OR
[
http://tinyurl.com/669xvm]

The "Student As Scholar / Scholar As Student" Global Open-To-AnyOne Facebook Group Is Located At

[http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=27141416631]

!!! PLEASE JOIN AND CONTRIBUTE !!!

/Gerry

Sunday, July 20, 2008

The Student as Scholar: Undergraduate Research and Creative Practice

Association of American Colleges and Universities

The Student as Scholar: Undergraduate Research and Creative Practice

Conference Description, Program, and Resources

300 faculty and administrators gathered in Long Beach, California on April 19-21, 2007 for a conference focused on integrating research and scholarship into the undergraduate experience with the goal of expanding and deepening learning for all students. Conference sessions explored developmental models, research and assessment of student learning, and examples of campus practice.

KEYNOTE: From Convocation to Capstone: Developing the Student as Scholar

David Hodge, Kira Pasquesi, Marissa Hirsh / Miami University ; Paul LePore / University of Washington

In order to integrate undergraduate research most effectively into the learning experience, undergraduate education should focus on the “student as scholar” from the first to final year. President Hodge will offer a vision of the student as scholar, where ‘scholar’ is defined in terms of an attitude, an intellectual posture, and a frame of mind derived from the best traditions of an engaged liberal education. Fulfilling this vision of the student as scholar will require a fundamental shift in how we imagine and structure the curriculum. In this new paradigm, the curriculum is learning-centered, providing intentional pathways that culminate in capstone experiences, peer-reviewed research papers, and creative presentations.

... [T]he undergraduate research experience is often viewed too narrowly as an isolated component of the student’s education, or as suitable for only some of the most advanced students. In this paper we argue that undergraduate research should, in fact, be at the center of the undergraduate experience, that undergraduate education should adopt the “Student as Scholar” Model throughout the curriculum, where scholar is conceived in terms of an attitude, an intellectual posture, and a frame of mind derived from the best traditions of an engaged liberal arts education. With this framework, not only each research project, but also each course, is viewed as an integrated, and integrating, part of the student experience.

Developing the Student as Scholar Model requires a fundamental shift in how we structure and imagine the whole undergraduate experience. It requires, as a minimum, the adoption of the Learning Paradigm in everything from the first introductory course through the final capstone experience. It requires a culture of inquiry-based learning infused throughout the entire liberal arts curriculum that starts with the very first day of college and is reinforced in every classroom and program. It transcends the boundaries of the classroom and takes advantage of the vast amounts of raw material now available to undergraduates. And it draws heavily from a developmentally-appropriate perspective of undergraduate education, where students move from a more passive, externally motivated experience to the active, internally-motivated posture of a scholar.

At its core, this is a vision of undergraduate education that offers students sustained and consistent emphasis on their identity as learners and as scholars, gradually blurring the distinction between the two, and it provides opportunities to develop meaningful connections to faculty and other students in campus environments that establish and support vibrant learning communities. The adoption of the Student as Scholar Model is the culmination of fundamental shifts in our underlying educational philosophy, specifically from a teaching paradigm that emphasizes telling students what they need to know, to a learning paradigm that emphasizes inquiry in shaping how students learn what they need to know, to a discovery paradigm that emphasizes inquiry with no boundaries.

In this paper we first examine the shift in educational paradigms and define what it means to be a student as scholar. We emphasize how the changing context of technology and scholarship makes the discovery paradigm possible now and increasingly so in the future.

[Much More]

[http://www.aacu.org/meetings/undergraduate_research/documents/Keynote.pdf]

Presentation (ppt) / Address (pdf) / Podcast Recording (mpg)

A Related Presentation Was Deleivered By David C. Hodge At Learning Through Enquiry Alliance (LTEA) Conference 2008:
Inquiry In A Networked World Held
At The University of Sheffield In Late-June 2008

[http://networked-inquiry.pbwiki.com/About+the+LTEA2008+keynote]

Select Conference Workshops, Posters, Roundtable Discussions Case Studies, Plenaries

WORKSHOPS

Sustainable Models of Student–Faculty Collaboration

Research and Creative Scholarship: An Integral Part of the Undergraduate Experience

Assessing the Impact of Undergraduate Research on Student Learning and Campus Culture

POSTERS

Providing Undergraduates with a Research Training Roadmap

Research Ethics Training for Undergraduates

Undergraduate Research: Theirs, Mine, and Ours

Experiences in Research: A Structured, Faculty-Mentored Program for First-Year Students

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS

Collaborative Undergraduate Research Seminars: Providing a “Research I” Experience

Institutionalizing Student Research Opportunities: Creating Visibility and Promoting Collaboration for Engaged Learning

Implementing an Integrative Research Sequence: The “Scientific Core”

Interdisciplinary Research: Building a Bridge to Scientific Inquiry in the 21st Century

Integrating Theory and Practice: An Action Research Case Study

Supporting Undergraduate Research: Centralized and Decentralized Institutional Models and the Role of Statewide Programs

Students’ Expectations of the Analytic and Communications Skills Needed for Research

Co-Creating Pathways to Student Scholarship: A Developmental Trajectory of Experience, Reflection, Research, and Scholarship

CASE STUDIES

A Comprehensive Approach to Student Scholarship

A Developmental Approach to Undergraduate Research in the Sciences

Building a Learner-Centered Environment through Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity

Moving Undergraduate Research Beyond a Few Disciplines and a Few Student

Developing Student Scholars from Convocation through Commencement: An Institution-Wide Model

What Does the Research Tell Us about Undergraduate Research?

The Role of Undergraduate Research in Student Retention and Academic Success

Multiple Models for Incorporating Undergraduate Research into the Curriculum

Assessing Science Enrichment Programs: Measuring Students’ Development as Scholars

Collaborative Research and Creative Inquiry

Thinking Like a Scientist: Building Skills on the Way to a Culminating Research Experience

Integrating Undergraduate Research and Service-learning in Self-Designed Capstone Projects

Using an ePortfolio as a Personal Knowledge Management System

Educating Undergraduate Research Mentors

The Sociology of Everyday Life: Student Scholars in the Introductory Classroom

Adapting the UIW McNair Model to Engage Faculty and Students in Undergraduate Research

Designing and Implementing an Undergraduate Research Program

EUREKA! Building an Integrated University-Wide Model for Engaging Students in Undergraduate Research

Organizing and Implementing a Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference

The Importance of Institutional, Disciplinary, and Interdisciplinary Definitions of Scholarship

Fostering Undergraduate Research in the Arts and Humanities

Integrating Undergraduate Research and Engagement Programs across Departmental, Disciplinary, and Developmental Boundaries

Equal Partners: Participatory Research Involving Faculty, Students, and Community Members

Improving the Quality of Student Research through Information Fluency

Creating and Publishing Undergraduate Research Journals

PLENARIES

Enhancing Academic Excellence through Inquiry, Research, and Creative Practice

Toward a Collaborative, Learning-Centered Culture: Phases of Institutional Development

Key Elements to Building a Sustainable Undergraduate Research Program

SOURCE

[http://www.aacu.org/meetings/undergraduate_research/]

PODCASTS

[http://www.aacu.org/Podcast/UG07_podcasts.cfm]

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Science in the 21st Century: Science, Society, and Information Technology

Science in the 21st Century: Science, Society, and Information Technology
September 8th-12th 2008, Perimeter Institute, Waterloo, Ontario


Times are changing. In the earlier days, we used to go to the library, today we search and archive our papers online. We have collaborations per email, hold telephone seminars, organize virtual networks, write blogs, and make our seminars available on the internet. Without any doubt, these technological developments influence the way science is done, and they also redefine our relation to the society we live in. Information exchange and management, the scientific community, and the society as a whole can be thought of as a triangle of relationships, the mutual interactions in which are becoming increasingly important.

[http://www.science21stcentury.org/]

TOPICS

Web/Web 2.0.

  • Communication, Social and Information Networks, Wikis, Blogs, Information Overflow, and the Illusion of Knowledge

Globalization

  • Collaboration and Competition in the Scientific Community, the Global Village, the Limits of Growth, Science and Democracy

Open Access

  • Scientific Publishing, Science Journalism, Framing, and the 'Marketplace of Ideas'

Sociology

  • Ethics, Morals, Trends, and Their Impact on Scientific Directions, Organization of Our Communities, Fragmentation, Feedback, Selection, and the Ivory Tower.

Miscellaneous and Other

  • Teaching, Information Storage, Resilience and the Next Generation

PROGRAM

Preliminary Schedule (July 11st)

MONDAY / SEPTEMBER 8 2008

9:15 / REGISTRATION

9:45 / Hossenfelder, Sabine / Opening/

10:00 / Hossenfelder, Sabine / Introduction

11:00 / Orzel, Chad / Talking to My Dog about Science: Weblogs and Public Outreach

12:00 / LUNCH

14:00 / Distler, Jacques / Blogs, Wikis, MathML: Scientific Communication

15:00 / COFFEE BREAK

15:30 / Willinsky, John / Open Access Is Public Access

16:30 / Discussion / The Fall of the Ivory Tower: Science Gets Closer to the Public

18:00 / RECEPTION

19:00 / Pang, Alex / Mapping Science in the 21st Century

TUESDAY / SEPTEMBER 9 2008

10:00 / Hannay, Timo / TBA

11:00 / Ginsparg, Paul / Next-Generation Implications of Open Access

12:00 / LUNCH

14:00 / Nielsen, Michael / Cultural Openness and Its Connection to Online Innovation in Science

15:00 / COFFEE BREAK

15:30 / Odlyzko, Andrew / The Evolution of Scholarly Communication and the Supreme Power of Inertia

16:30 / Discussion / The Future of Scientific Collaboration

18:00 / Meeting (Alice Room) / IT Tools for Science

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 2008

10:00 / Collins, Harry / TBA

11:00 / Fuller, Steve (per video) / TBA

12:00 /LUNCH

14:00 / Kaiser, David / Toil, Trouble, and the Cold War Bubble: Physics and the Academy since World War II

15:00 / COFFEE BREAK

15:30 / Smolin, Lee / Science as an Ethical Community

16:30 / Discussion /Power and Progress: Democracy and Ethics in Science

19:00 /CONFERENCE DINNER

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 2008

10:00 / Noveck, Beth / TBA

11:00 / Weinstein, Eric / TBA

12:00 / LUNCH

14:00 / Wellman, Barry / Networked Individualism and the Triple Revolution: Networks, Internet and Mobility

15:00 / COFFEE BREAK

15:30 / Börner, Katy / 21st Century Science Maps

16:30 / Discussion / Information Flow and Overflow: How the Internet Changes Our Lives

19:00 / Discussion / Scientific Utopia: Alternative Forms of Scientific Institutions

FRIDAY / SEPTEMBER 12 2008

10:00 / Wilson, Greg / Can the Web Make Scientists Brush Their Teeth?

11:00 / Neylon, Cameron / Science in the Open /or/ How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My Blog

12:00 / LUNCH

14:00 / Zivkovic, Bora / Summary / Closing Discussion

15:00 END OF CONFERENCE

[http://www.science21stcentury.org/program.html]

ABSTRACTS

[http://www.science21stcentury.org/abstracts.html]

PARTICIPANTS

[http://www.science21stcentury.org/participants.html]

REGISTRATION

[http://www.science21stcentury.org/registration.html]

HOST

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

[http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/]